Glassdoor Work Life Balance FAQ

Read what Glassdoor employees think about work life balance at the company and make sure this fits your lifestyle. Employees have questions about everything from the work from home policy, overtime and flexibility.

Glassdoor has a work life balance rating of 4.3.

All answers shown come directly from Glassdoor Reviews and are not edited or altered.

What is overtime like at Glassdoor?

3 English reviews out of 3

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16 June 2020

Pros

Nice office and the people are friendly.

Cons

- Extremely high targets which are completely unreachable (people often end up cheating the system in order to hit targets - this cycle never ends) - The product itself is over priced and completely dated - Management wont allow anyone on the team to speak their minds and challenge them, if you do you're branded as "negative". - On boarding and training is far too short and condensed despite the sheer amount of new tools/systems one has to learn. - Lack of communication between upper management often led to confusion and distrust within the team as guidance was not always clear. - Work life balance is extremely poor, many SDR's were working overtime and on holidays to reach targets and push out massive amounts of volume to reach ridiculously high weekly KPI's set out by managers. - One of the lowest paying sales job compared with other Tech startups in Dublin right now.

Advice to Management

- It is obvious that all of the managers read the same "How to be a good manager" handbook at whatever convention they all attended. Every problem is dealt with in the same manner and they seem unable to adapt to different personality types. Your "brand" is the biggest thing they care about which basically means that you have to be an easily brainwashed robot.

Work life balance is extremely poor, many SDR's were working overtime and on holidays to reach targets and push out massive amounts of volume to reach ridiculously high weekly KPI's set out by managers.

16 June 2020

Reviewed by: SDR in Dublin, Dublin (Former Employee)

30 October 2019

Pros

-I have been at Glassdoor for close to 5 years, and have seen a lot of growth and changes. -Taken together, Glassdoor is the best place I have ever worked. The culture is friendly but very smart, without huge egos getting in the way of our mission. My team is like a family to me, and overall the culture is empathetic, collaborative, and positive. -As a startup, people at Glassdoor were attracted by our mission to help people find a job and company that they love. Although we have grown dramatically during my time here, our CEO has been a north star for our culture, preserving it despite turnover, setbacks, growth, and successes. -Overall, the acquisition of the company by Recruit Holdings was a net positive for employees. Many long-time employees were handsomely rewarded by their cashed out stock options. It was honorable of the company to continue to pay out options after the acquisition, and showed the CEO's respect for employees. -Little has changed in the company since the acquisition. There have been no layoffs, no major operational changes, and even a few efficiencies on the engineering side from better coordination with our sister companies. -There were substantial pay raises for most employees after the acquisition, which brought up pay to SF Bay Area market rates. My comp today is even or above most competitors for similar roles. -We have preserved our great benefits package despite our growth and maturity as an employer. We still offer unlimited vacation, free lunch (in Mill Valley at least) and pretty terrific health coverage. -People with families are encouraged to take time off, and work flexibly to make sure their home responsibilities are covered. People work hard, but there is not a "spend 10 hours at your desk" culture here -- people work from home, take meetings via Zoom, communicate via Slack, and get the same amount of work done while also creating space for home life. -The company HQ is moving to SF in Fall 2020 (finally) which will dramatically improve commutes for many employees and will help us with recruiting SF talent as well. Marin is beautiful, but there is a reason no other major tech players have offices here -- there is no commercial real estate, no one can afford to live in Marin except execs, there are fires + flooding + power outages in Marin regularly, and you are on an island far away from SF making casual networking impossible. It's time for Glassdoor to put on its big-boy pants and finally move into the city like a real company -- that's finally happening now.

Cons

-My impression of our Product and Engineering orgs after 5 years here is that they are fairly conservative and slow-moving. We are behind the curve technically in many areas, and our roadmaps move really slowly. I don't know what the solution is, but lack of innovation on product and engineering are a serious long-term problem we face. -We are a tiny player in our competitive space, and that's not changing much over time. That lack of rapid upward momentum in terms of our business is very different than in the early years here, and it's sometimes hard to stay motivated without big growth prospects in the future. My team is growing really slowly (if at all) and feels like treading water sometimes. -I think we are moving too slowly in moving our HQ into San Francisco. For too long our physical location has been unduly influenced (in my opinion) by where our executive team has chosen to buy homes. Most employees are in SF or East Bay, not Marin, and there is a huge disconnect between the personal interests of execs who would like a short commute and the majority of the talent base who bears the cost of long commutes, lack of quality public transit, and unaffordable real estate for us to be in Marin. If we want to be a real company, we need to act like one and move to where the talent is -- not where our exec team wants to have a pleasant lifestyle (and can afford to live). -Our data infrastructure is not great. This is a hard problem to solve, at least with current leadership on the relevant teams. But other tech companies have figured this out, and we could do better. Data is too slow, not well documented, not widely accessible, and hard for product managers and business decision makers to get access to.

Advice to Management

-As a small company, we should be pushing our teams to move faster and be more nimble, particularly in Product and Engineering. We have to re-light the fire of innovation, breakthrough ideas, and fast-moving product releases to regain our competitive edge in our space. Too much emphasis today is being paid on our employee culture (which is already great) and soft management skills. What we need is a hard-headed infusion of innovation and a boost in our appetite for taking risks and overturning old ways of doing things that aren't delivering results. -As we transition to a new CEO, please keep in mind that the behavior of the CEO is a model that everyone else in leadership will emulate. The CEO is a beacon that guides our culture. Please be a mindful caretaker of Glassdoor's very special culture during this period of transition, and show us the way toward a bigger and brighter future as a company.

We are a tiny player in our competitive space, and that's not changing much over time.

30 October 2019

Reviewed by: Senior Director in Mill Valley, CA (Current Employee)

11 May 2020

Pros

The people are smart and down to earth. My team was incredible. In my experience, my manager really cared about my development, provided actionable feedback, and was always supportive and encouraging. I had work life balance and while we worked from home during COVID-19, our people team went above and beyond to provide anything we needed.

Cons

Where do I begin? The last year at Glassdoor has been a complete mess for Customer Success. Culture turned into nothing but gossiping and complaining. Even our Sales counterparts would make constant comments about how bad we had it. In hindsight, it was warranted because eventually it all blew up once the pandemic hit. Senior management is BAD, particularly in CS, and they are aware. They've shared our feedback of them and it's pitiful. They completely lack compassion in every single decision they make and constantly miss the mark. It started to become clear in the last few months that Glassdoor was really lacking vision and the ability to reinvent. Site traffic was down and our customers were bored with our offerings. CS superstars started finding new jobs/leaving. In addition, internally, there were many smaller announcements and decisions being made that were red flags to me. It felt like they were trying to cut costs in any way they could. An example would be, in Customer Success, they announced a re-classfication of employees changed us to hourly workers, and took away unlimited PTO (with no comparable alternative). This was all under the guise that it was "legally required" and "in our best interest" (so that we could get overtime). We all saw right through it. The announcement was tone deaf and dishonest. Teams started challenging the decision and then some were able to get reclassified and after feedback, they magically were able to bring unlimited PTO back (shocker) shortly before layoffs (meaning they would not owe us much if any vacation time). This is the constant theme of leadership, both in CS and company wide. There is always some shady motive to every decision. The fact that they were able to determine a layoff of 1/3 of the workforce was necessary so soon tells me all I need to know about the future of Glassdoor. They haven't been able to reinvent themselves and I'm sure it's only a matter of time before they are one with Indeed. I would have the same feedback if I weren't laid off.

Advice to Management

Treat employees as actual humans and not just pawns to get to your bottom line. This was your opportunity to be transparent, and while no one could have predicted COVID-19's impact, you once again missed the mark, catching hundreds of us off guard. What a humiliating experience to hear this announcement and have to share with our teams that we were the ones that "did not make the cut." A follow up meeting where no questions could be asked immediately after was the icing on the cake.

This was all under the guise that it was "legally required" and "in our best interest" (so that we could get overtime).

11 May 2020

Reviewed by: Customer Success Manager in Chicago, IL (Former Employee)

3 English reviews out of 3

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